In type 2 diabetic patient, his pancreas doesn’t produce or use enough insulin, required for a body. This condition is called insulin resistance. Insulin is a hormone, which regulates the movement of glucose in blood and cells, needs to make energy.  For some people, type 2 diabetes may be managed through diet and exercise. Others may also need medication, and sometimes insulin injections, to manage blood sugar.
As with most detoxes, it gets worse before it gets better. I had intense gluten withdrawal, which caused headaches, irritability, and the craziest cravings I had ever experienced. I felt like I would die (or someone in my immediate vicinity might) if I didn’t immediately eat a pizza-pasta-bread sandwich. Thankfully, it passed in a couple of days, and the other side saw a lifting of “brain fog” that I didn’t even know I had. So much energy! Such clarity! It felt pretty great.

Dr. Hyman’s research made sense to me, so I thought I’d give his diet a try. With little less than a month until my follow-up doctor’s appointment, I wanted to jumpstart my progress. I read his 10-Day Detox Diet, which cuts out not only the inflammation triggers of gluten, dairy, caffeine, and alcohol, but also all grains, most fruit, legumes, and starchy vegetables, to help maintain balanced blood sugar levels. I welcomed the return of humanely-produced lean protein and an almost laughable amount of healthy fats — nearly 20 g per meal — which was absolutely shocking to someone who grew up in the 1980s and 1990s, when fat was the enemy. Could this really produce results? I was about to find out.
The first way to remove any such toxins from your body is to change your diet. This is a type of diet, which contains various essential food items but along with that one is also advised to get supplements for betterment of their body. Under this detox diet, some particular nutrients are added, and hence, the food, which produces a higher level of blood glucose in your body, is neglected.
Discover the root of your endless sweet tooth by adapting your daily routine first; you may find your body responds immediately (goodbye afternoon sugar crashes!) "You want to prioritize food that can anchor sugar in your diet, so that it's not releasing into your blood stream so fast (hence the crashing)," Sassos explains. "Protein and fiber are two things that can help you avoid a sugar rush and crash in a given day, especially if you know you've overdone it... incorporating those two things in your daily routine can stabilize your blood sugar."
I’m currently reading the book for the second time. I think that it is outstanding. What you wrote is not taught in medical school, that’s why some physicians may not support it. Don’t worry my friend, the Public will support you, because you have done a superb job of researching, treating yourself and putting it in writing. Let the book speak for itself and you.
×