Tara Bellucci is a lifestyle writer and marketing consultant focused on helping entrepreneurs boost their small businesses. Her work has appeared on Apartment Therapy, The Kitchn, and Boston.com. A co-founder of the Boston Food Swap, she hosts monthly events where people swap homemade and homegrown food. She writes openly about her health journey at MindMouthMantra.com.
A 7-day plan can help you optimize your diet to be closer to the ADA's recommended daily sugar intake, and also to make better choices after you've eaten too much sugar (it happens!). If you find yourself feeling more energized and better, you may think about a longer diet change in the future — Sugar Shock also provides a 21-day meal plan and shopping list. That plan could help you grow into good lifelong diet habits with targeted recipes, meal plans, and shopping lists.
Restructuring your daily meals for longer than a week can help you realize that sugar might not be totally to blame for all of your sluggish behavior. Sassos says making a longer diet change can push you to also prioritize getting enough sleep each night, and also work on ensuring you're properly hydrated each and every day. "Getting enough sleep and drinking enough water are often neglected," Sassos says. "No one prioritizes this in their routine, and yet they're the simplest things that you can do for your body for overall health and to wardoff sugar cravings."
Frontload your meals with protein and fiber: This is crucial if you've managed to eat or drink too much sugar early in the day. Protein and fiber, when paired with a carbohydrate of choice, can stabilize your blood sugar and help you avoid that dreaded crash. Be sure to choose snacks and meals that are high in fiber and protein naturally: hard-boiled eggs, for one, or even a small omelette; a handful of nuts at your desk; an apple with peanut butter, or even some crudité and hummus.
Understand the general principles of diabetic dieting to better determine what requirements a detox plan must satisfy before being sound for diabetics. According to the Mayo Clinic, diabetics regulate their blood sugar levels through diet by controlling both the quantity and type of carbohydrate consumed, with slower digesting carbohydrates being preferable as they impact blood sugar levels less significantly. These slow-digesting carbs consist mainly of fruits and vegetables, making these staple items in any diabetic diet.

Finally, something that is customizable and caring. My husband and I were given a class when we called with questions. We watched a DVD and starting reading the book. We are very excited, because it makes sense and after the first day of applying the meals and juiced, my husband’s blood sugar came down over 10 points! We are going to jump in and get this done.
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