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All you need to do is boil some neem leaves in a glass of water and drink. The water might be bitter and pungent in taste, but trust us, it does wonders for overall health. For the unversed, neem leaves are loaded with antioxidants, anti-inflammatory and antiviral properties. As per a study in the journal Studies on Ethno-Medicine, neem may also help control the symptoms of diabetes.
Once you know you have the potential to suffer from diabetes, or you already have diabetes, you can’t ignore this diagnosis. Leaving this type of condition to fester in your body will continue to damage your body over time. You may not see the effects today or tomorrow, but the delay of proper changes in your life could eventually ruin your body with neuropathy, kidney disease, or worse. By taking part in this six-week plan, you are pushing yourself in the direction of better health and lifelong benefits.
Stefani Sassos, MS, RD, a registered dietitian within the Good Housekeeping Institute, explains that excessive sugar can spike your blood sugar levels... and then turn into a sudden drop off afterwards. This is why you may feel super fatigued in the moment, or push through a huge mood swing, in any given afternoon. Over the long run, however, eating too much sugar can greatly influence your risk for heart disease and type 2 diabetes, chronic dietary inflammation, and severe fatigue, among other physical risks. "There's a ripple effect on your body, as it can get accustomed to lots of sugar," she adds, citing habits like a daily office donut or sugary sweet coffee drink. "Over time, it becomes this difficult thing to decipher: Am I addicted to this, did I train my body to crave this food?"
I’m currently reading the book for the second time. I think that it is outstanding. What you wrote is not taught in medical school, that’s why some physicians may not support it. Don’t worry my friend, the Public will support you, because you have done a superb job of researching, treating yourself and putting it in writing. Let the book speak for itself and you.
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