While it felt like an undertaking to commit to such a change, I figured that I could do practically anything for 10 days, so why not give it a shot? As I prepared to make everything that passed my lips for the next week and a half, I filled my shopping cart with raw nuts and coconut oil, hemp and flax and chia seeds, a lot of avocados, and a farmers market’s worth of leafy greens and cruciferous veggies. I was ready to detox.
It’s not a surprise that New Year’s resolutions tend to focus on losing weight, getting healthier, and feeling better. And like most people, you want the weight off yesterday and you want to feel better now! So, even though, deep inside, you know that the smart, sensible way to lose weight and gain more energy is by taking it slow and steady, some of those quick weight-loss plans seem pretty tempting. Maybe what’s caught your attention is a “detox” diet. What can it hurt, you ask?
Ensure you are eating your micronutrients: Counteract too much sugar by supercharging your next meal for your liver's benefit; namely with dark, leafy green vegetables that are high in a suite of micronutrients. "Try to eat foods to help assist the liver in natural detoxification, which is much healthier than doing something compensatory like sweat out the donuts you just ate… that isn't helpful, and may be harmful, in the long run," Sassos adds.
As with most detoxes, it gets worse before it gets better. I had intense gluten withdrawal, which caused headaches, irritability, and the craziest cravings I had ever experienced. I felt like I would die (or someone in my immediate vicinity might) if I didn’t immediately eat a pizza-pasta-bread sandwich. Thankfully, it passed in a couple of days, and the other side saw a lifting of “brain fog” that I didn’t even know I had. So much energy! Such clarity! It felt pretty great.
Detoxification, or detox, diets are typically short-term diets that promise to rid the body of environmental toxins. Most detox plans begin with a period of fasting followed by a strict menu of raw vegetables, fruit, juices and/or water. Many plans involve taking specific herbs or other supplements and may require a colon cleanse, otherwise known as an enema.
Detoxification, or detox, diets are typically short-term diets that promise to rid the body of environmental toxins. Most detox plans begin with a period of fasting followed by a strict menu of raw vegetables, fruit, juices and/or water. Many plans involve taking specific herbs or other supplements and may require a colon cleanse, otherwise known as an enema.
The second case is that the body can produce insulin, but because of present body condition, the body resists using it, hence because of which the blood glucose does not gets used. If you are urinating more number of time then usual, feeling more hunger or fatigue, then you should go to your doctor for a checkup as these are some common symptoms of type 2 diabetes.
Stay hydrated: Keeping up with water and unsweetened beverages is important, as a lack of water or fluids can make it that much harder for your liver to handle excess sugar. While chugging a liter of water can't "flush" out the sugar in your system, Sassos says warm fluids like warm ginger tea may help to speed up the digestive process for those who are searching for some immediate relief — but that's not an effective long term solution.

According to information from the Mayo Clinic, diabetes is a disease which occurs when the body is no longer able to properly regulate its blood glucose (sugar) levels. Treatment for diabetes involves both prescription medication and regulation of dietary intake to keep blood sugar levels naturally low. While it can be difficult to reconcile the recommendations of diabetic dieting with those of many detox plans, there are nevertheless some plans which purport to achieve detoxification effects without compromising the principles of a diabetic diet.

You may believe that cutting out all sugar entirely from your diet is the best solution. Sassos, however, says this isn't the case for those with years of unhealthy sugar habits under their belt: Simply cutting out sugar or cycling through compensatory behaviors (like "running it off" after eating third helpings of dessert) can lead to even more unhealthy eating patterns down the line. Whether you like to call it a detox or think of it more like a "reset," she argues a long term lifestyle change is the surest way to kick the bad habit.


Detoxification, or detox, diets are typically short-term diets that promise to rid the body of environmental toxins. Most detox plans begin with a period of fasting followed by a strict menu of raw vegetables, fruit, juices and/or water. Many plans involve taking specific herbs or other supplements and may require a colon cleanse, otherwise known as an enema.


Stefani Sassos, MS, RD, a registered dietitian within the Good Housekeeping Institute, explains that excessive sugar can spike your blood sugar levels... and then turn into a sudden drop off afterwards. This is why you may feel super fatigued in the moment, or push through a huge mood swing, in any given afternoon. Over the long run, however, eating too much sugar can greatly influence your risk for heart disease and type 2 diabetes, chronic dietary inflammation, and severe fatigue, among other physical risks. "There's a ripple effect on your body, as it can get accustomed to lots of sugar," she adds, citing habits like a daily office donut or sugary sweet coffee drink. "Over time, it becomes this difficult thing to decipher: Am I addicted to this, did I train my body to crave this food?"
Follow nutritionist Jay Robb's (Everydiet.org) Fruit Flush for a healthy three-day detox for diabetics. Throughout day one of the plan, consume a protein shake every two hours (from 8 am until 4 pm) using whey protein. At 6 pm, consume a healthy dinner consisting of chicken breasts (around four ounces), three to six cups of vegetable salad, and a tablespoon of olive oil. On days two and three of the plan, consume fresh fruit every two hours (again, from 8 am to 4 pm) with a healthy dinner consisting of a protein shake, half of an avocado (for healthy fats), and vegetable salad at 6 pm. This plan comports with the principles of diabetic dieting by relegating your overall nutritional intake to healthy, slow-digesting carbs like fruits and vegetables while providing plenty of added nutrition in the form of protein, lean meat and healthy fats. At the end of the three days you will have likely lost a few pounds without diverging too far from your original diabetic diet.
I’m currently reading the book for the second time. I think that it is outstanding. What you wrote is not taught in medical school, that’s why some physicians may not support it. Don’t worry my friend, the Public will support you, because you have done a superb job of researching, treating yourself and putting it in writing. Let the book speak for itself and you.
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