It’s not a surprise that New Year’s resolutions tend to focus on losing weight, getting healthier, and feeling better. And like most people, you want the weight off yesterday and you want to feel better now! So, even though, deep inside, you know that the smart, sensible way to lose weight and gain more energy is by taking it slow and steady, some of those quick weight-loss plans seem pretty tempting. Maybe what’s caught your attention is a “detox” diet. What can it hurt, you ask?

If you work with your primary care doctor to control your diabetes, you may have to go to extremes to monitor your blood sugar. This type of care involves pricking your finger for blood samples or even injecting yourself with the insulin your body is not creating for itself. If you want to live a healthier life that is free from the pain of blood draws and injections, the 6-Week Diabetes Detox program may be the right step for you.


“Sugar makes you fat, ugly and old,” said Brooke Alpert, a registered dietitian and co-author of “The Sugar Detox: Lose the Sugar, Lose the Weight – Look and Feel Great.” “What we’ve discovered in the last couple of years is that sugar is keeping us overweight. It’s also a leading cause of heart disease; it negatively affects skin, and it leads to premature aging.”
Diabetes Management has become yet more important in the current situation (read: ongoing Coronavirus pandemic). As per fitness and nutrition expert, Rohit Shelatkar, "the Centre for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has suggested that people with type-2 diabetes are at higher risk of severe troubles from COVID-19 infection." While proper medication is a must to manage diabetes, one must also look into a healthy diet to boost healthy living naturally. "There's a strong link between diabetes, inflammation and immune system. Hence, one must opt for healthy diet options to control blood sugar and strengthen immunity," Shelatkar further stated.
Tara Bellucci is a lifestyle writer and marketing consultant focused on helping entrepreneurs boost their small businesses. Her work has appeared on Apartment Therapy, The Kitchn, and Boston.com. A co-founder of the Boston Food Swap, she hosts monthly events where people swap homemade and homegrown food. She writes openly about her health journey at MindMouthMantra.com.
For example, breakfast can include three eggs, any style; lunch can include up to 6 ounces of poultry, fish or tofu and a green salad, and dinner is basically a larger version of lunch, though steamed vegetables such as broccoli, kale and spinach can be eaten in place of salad. Snacks include an ounce of nuts and sliced peppers with hummus. Beverages include water, unsweetened tea and black coffee.
I’m currently reading the book for the second time. I think that it is outstanding. What you wrote is not taught in medical school, that’s why some physicians may not support it. Don’t worry my friend, the Public will support you, because you have done a superb job of researching, treating yourself and putting it in writing. Let the book speak for itself and you.
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