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It’s not a surprise that New Year’s resolutions tend to focus on losing weight, getting healthier, and feeling better. And like most people, you want the weight off yesterday and you want to feel better now! So, even though, deep inside, you know that the smart, sensible way to lose weight and gain more energy is by taking it slow and steady, some of those quick weight-loss plans seem pretty tempting. Maybe what’s caught your attention is a “detox” diet. What can it hurt, you ask?
In this case, “detox” doesn’t mean checking into a rehab facility to wean yourself off alcohol. What “detox” refers to, in the dieting world at least, is a dietary detoxification plan. This is a temporary dieting plan (as are most diets) that involves following a regimen (usually pretty extreme) in order to cleanse your body of “toxic” substances such as pesticides, chemicals, additives, pollutants…or food that just isn’t very good for you. Sometimes people “detox” in order to clear their minds, sharpen their focus, or lose weight quickly.
A sugar detox may help you bring your sugar consumption into moderation, away from the levels that average Americans consume in any given day. While Sassos notes that the American Heart Association recommends less than 25g (about six teaspoons) of sugar daily for women, and 36 grams (about nine teaspoons) for men, the organization notes that the average American consumes 77g; an immediate block on all sources of added sugar would be hard to sustain for most anyone, Sassos points out. You'll need to work on reducing your intake slowly,targeting packaged foods that can be swapped with better-for-you alternatives.
Lemon Juice is a good source of flavonoids which are known for their antioxidant properties. Vitamin C is the most abundant antioxidant in lemon. Since it contains antioxidants, lemon juice helps fight free radicals in the body, thus strengthening our immune system. The antioxidant properties of lemons are supported in this study which showed that the lemon flavonoids suppressed oxidative stress in diabetic rats.
I know this diet works because I have been following the plan without realizing it. I stumbled upon Mr. McCulley on utube. l I am waiting on the book to tweak what I have been doing … To my amazement my sugar plummeted. I stopped the insulin because my sugars would drop too low if I took it. … My doctor told me to forget the insulin and keep doing what I’m doing.
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