There is no obvious but an indirect link between type-2 diabetes and obesity as obese people are particularly vulnerable to developing Diabetes Mellitus 2 and obesity is a driving factor because it triggers insulin resistance, a condition in which the body produces insulin that is insufficient. Having insulin resistance, the body tends to build up glucose in the blood instead of being absorbed by the cells, leading to type-2 diabetes.
According to information from the Mayo Clinic, diabetes is a disease which occurs when the body is no longer able to properly regulate its blood glucose (sugar) levels. Treatment for diabetes involves both prescription medication and regulation of dietary intake to keep blood sugar levels naturally low. While it can be difficult to reconcile the recommendations of diabetic dieting with those of many detox plans, there are nevertheless some plans which purport to achieve detoxification effects without compromising the principles of a diabetic diet.
A sugar detox may help you bring your sugar consumption into moderation, away from the levels that average Americans consume in any given day. While Sassos notes that the American Heart Association recommends less than 25g (about six teaspoons) of sugar daily for women, and 36 grams (about nine teaspoons) for men, the organization notes that the average American consumes 77g; an immediate block on all sources of added sugar would be hard to sustain for most anyone, Sassos points out. You'll need to work on reducing your intake slowly,targeting packaged foods that can be swapped with better-for-you alternatives.
Stefani Sassos, MS, RD, a registered dietitian within the Good Housekeeping Institute, explains that excessive sugar can spike your blood sugar levels... and then turn into a sudden drop off afterwards. This is why you may feel super fatigued in the moment, or push through a huge mood swing, in any given afternoon. Over the long run, however, eating too much sugar can greatly influence your risk for heart disease and type 2 diabetes, chronic dietary inflammation, and severe fatigue, among other physical risks. "There's a ripple effect on your body, as it can get accustomed to lots of sugar," she adds, citing habits like a daily office donut or sugary sweet coffee drink. "Over time, it becomes this difficult thing to decipher: Am I addicted to this, did I train my body to crave this food?"

You may believe that cutting out all sugar entirely from your diet is the best solution. Sassos, however, says this isn't the case for those with years of unhealthy sugar habits under their belt: Simply cutting out sugar or cycling through compensatory behaviors (like "running it off" after eating third helpings of dessert) can lead to even more unhealthy eating patterns down the line. Whether you like to call it a detox or think of it more like a "reset," she argues a long term lifestyle change is the surest way to kick the bad habit.

Diabetes Management has become yet more important in the current situation (read: ongoing Coronavirus pandemic). As per fitness and nutrition expert, Rohit Shelatkar, "the Centre for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has suggested that people with type-2 diabetes are at higher risk of severe troubles from COVID-19 infection." While proper medication is a must to manage diabetes, one must also look into a healthy diet to boost healthy living naturally. "There's a strong link between diabetes, inflammation and immune system. Hence, one must opt for healthy diet options to control blood sugar and strengthen immunity," Shelatkar further stated.
Author Sidebar: Back when I was diabetic, my endocrinologist told me that a cleanse and detox would not help me with my diabetes. When I asked him why, he couldn’t give me a good answer. So, I did some research and decided to try a raw juice and green smoothie detox. Let me tell you something — I don’t want to get too graphic, but, after I drank a couple of green smoothies and went to the bathroom, I felt like I dropped 20 pounds! 🙂
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