All you need to do is boil some neem leaves in a glass of water and drink. The water might be bitter and pungent in taste, but trust us, it does wonders for overall health. For the unversed, neem leaves are loaded with antioxidants, anti-inflammatory and antiviral properties. As per a study in the journal Studies on Ethno-Medicine, neem may also help control the symptoms of diabetes.
The culinary versatility of onion is no secret to the world. It is a must-have vegetable in almost every global recipe. But did you know that it also helps managing diabetes? A study, published in the journal Environmental Health Insights, found a link between fresh onion and reduced blood glucose levels in type-1 and type-2 diabetics. Hence, adding onion water in your diet may help benefit your overall health. Add 2 chopped onion, 1 teaspoon lemon juice and a pinch of rock salt with a cup of water and blend everything together and drink. Do not strain the drink to make it fibre-rich.
Detox diets do have their appeal. The idea of cleansing your system and ridding your body of toxins, pollutants, and sludge is often what draws people to these plans. However, what many people don’t realize is that the body has its own built-in “detox” machine in the form of our internal organs. If we didn’t, we wouldn’t be around for too long. Our lungs, liver, kidneys, intestines, and immune system are highly efficient at ridding the body of harmful things, whether they be chemicals, fatty foods, or bacteria. Granted, sometimes our detox machines are overwhelmed by harmful substances, but for the most part, we all have a system in place to stay relatively healthy.
According to information from the Mayo Clinic, diabetes is a disease which occurs when the body is no longer able to properly regulate its blood glucose (sugar) levels. Treatment for diabetes involves both prescription medication and regulation of dietary intake to keep blood sugar levels naturally low. While it can be difficult to reconcile the recommendations of diabetic dieting with those of many detox plans, there are nevertheless some plans which purport to achieve detoxification effects without compromising the principles of a diabetic diet.
Detox diets do have their appeal. The idea of cleansing your system and ridding your body of toxins, pollutants, and sludge is often what draws people to these plans. However, what many people don’t realize is that the body has its own built-in “detox” machine in the form of our internal organs. If we didn’t, we wouldn’t be around for too long. Our lungs, liver, kidneys, intestines, and immune system are highly efficient at ridding the body of harmful things, whether they be chemicals, fatty foods, or bacteria. Granted, sometimes our detox machines are overwhelmed by harmful substances, but for the most part, we all have a system in place to stay relatively healthy.
Dr. Hyman’s research made sense to me, so I thought I’d give his diet a try. With little less than a month until my follow-up doctor’s appointment, I wanted to jumpstart my progress. I read his 10-Day Detox Diet, which cuts out not only the inflammation triggers of gluten, dairy, caffeine, and alcohol, but also all grains, most fruit, legumes, and starchy vegetables, to help maintain balanced blood sugar levels. I welcomed the return of humanely-produced lean protein and an almost laughable amount of healthy fats — nearly 20 g per meal — which was absolutely shocking to someone who grew up in the 1980s and 1990s, when fat was the enemy. Could this really produce results? I was about to find out.
Detoxification, or detox, diets are typically short-term diets that promise to rid the body of environmental toxins. Most detox plans begin with a period of fasting followed by a strict menu of raw vegetables, fruit, juices and/or water. Many plans involve taking specific herbs or other supplements and may require a colon cleanse, otherwise known as an enema.
I didn’t realize the amount of added sugar I consumed daily. I have one cup of coffee a day and I add two healthy teaspoons of sugar in it. I love can peaches in heavy syrup and because the calorie count per serving was only 100, I thought I was making a good choice. (Cottage cheese and peaches for breakfast, I thought I was doing good). But I never could lost weight and I often craved something sweet to eat. I going to take the advise of this ad and work on detoxing added sugar from my diet. Thank you for the tips.
Dr. Hyman’s research made sense to me, so I thought I’d give his diet a try. With little less than a month until my follow-up doctor’s appointment, I wanted to jumpstart my progress. I read his 10-Day Detox Diet, which cuts out not only the inflammation triggers of gluten, dairy, caffeine, and alcohol, but also all grains, most fruit, legumes, and starchy vegetables, to help maintain balanced blood sugar levels. I welcomed the return of humanely-produced lean protein and an almost laughable amount of healthy fats — nearly 20 g per meal — which was absolutely shocking to someone who grew up in the 1980s and 1990s, when fat was the enemy. Could this really produce results? I was about to find out.
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