Understand the general principles of diabetic dieting to better determine what requirements a detox plan must satisfy before being sound for diabetics. According to the Mayo Clinic, diabetics regulate their blood sugar levels through diet by controlling both the quantity and type of carbohydrate consumed, with slower digesting carbohydrates being preferable as they impact blood sugar levels less significantly. These slow-digesting carbs consist mainly of fruits and vegetables, making these staple items in any diabetic diet.
There is no obvious but an indirect link between type-2 diabetes and obesity as obese people are particularly vulnerable to developing Diabetes Mellitus 2 and obesity is a driving factor because it triggers insulin resistance, a condition in which the body produces insulin that is insufficient. Having insulin resistance, the body tends to build up glucose in the blood instead of being absorbed by the cells, leading to type-2 diabetes.

Detoxification, or detox, diets are typically short-term diets that promise to rid the body of environmental toxins. Most detox plans begin with a period of fasting followed by a strict menu of raw vegetables, fruit, juices and/or water. Many plans involve taking specific herbs or other supplements and may require a colon cleanse, otherwise known as an enema.

Eating too much sugar may be the most apparent dietary faux pas you can make — after all, your body immediately feels the after effects of a sugar rush, and the inevitable dreaded crash that follows. Over time, however, your body may become accustomed to the copious amounts of sugar you consume, maybe without you even realizing it; added sugar has a funny way of sneaking into everyday items that you don't even associate with being sweet. And since items high in added sugar are often lacking nutrients, eating sugary foods can often lead to uncontrolled weight gain over time. Before you know it, you may be unconsciously reaching for sugary sweet treats at the end of every meal (even if you are full!) as a love of sweets turns into an unhealthy sugar habit and extra pounds.
Ensure you are eating your micronutrients: Counteract too much sugar by supercharging your next meal for your liver's benefit; namely with dark, leafy green vegetables that are high in a suite of micronutrients. "Try to eat foods to help assist the liver in natural detoxification, which is much healthier than doing something compensatory like sweat out the donuts you just ate… that isn't helpful, and may be harmful, in the long run," Sassos adds.
You may believe that cutting out all sugar entirely from your diet is the best solution. Sassos, however, says this isn't the case for those with years of unhealthy sugar habits under their belt: Simply cutting out sugar or cycling through compensatory behaviors (like "running it off" after eating third helpings of dessert) can lead to even more unhealthy eating patterns down the line. Whether you like to call it a detox or think of it more like a "reset," she argues a long term lifestyle change is the surest way to kick the bad habit.
I would be remiss if I didn’t mention the importance of the emotional support that I received from my mother and daughter. After I recovered from the diabetic coma, they took care of me when I was released from the hospital. Their support allowed me to “detox” my mind and remove all of the negative thoughts that I was getting from my endocrinologist.
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