Discover the root of your endless sweet tooth by adapting your daily routine first; you may find your body responds immediately (goodbye afternoon sugar crashes!) "You want to prioritize food that can anchor sugar in your diet, so that it's not releasing into your blood stream so fast (hence the crashing)," Sassos explains. "Protein and fiber are two things that can help you avoid a sugar rush and crash in a given day, especially if you know you've overdone it... incorporating those two things in your daily routine can stabilize your blood sugar."
With so many large claims about what this program can do for you, you may have a few questions that you want answered beforehand. Rather than calling or emailing the creators behind the 6-Week Diabetes Detox Guidebook, the website redirects you to http://whitewavesupport.com to fill out a support ticket. There is no indication of how long you will need to wait to receive a reply.
Apple Cider Vinegar can lower blood pressure when consumed daily as it contains acetic acid – a compound known to decrease blood pressure or hypertension. The antihypertensive effects of acetic acid and vinegar were proven in a study published in ‘Bioscience, Biotechnology and Biochemistry’ journal in which the spontaneously hypertensive rats showed significant decrease in blood pressure and rennin activity when given acetic acid or vinegar.
Then, I picked up Dr. Mark Hyman’s book Blood Sugar Solution. In it, he explains how common allergens like gluten, dairy, alcohol, and caffeine affect our bodies, even if we’re not technically allergic. Certain foods are more likely to cause inflammation, which is a stress response that the body produces when we are fighting off something. A little inflammation helps you heal and then goes away, a ton of it hurts you and becomes constant. Inflammation and insulin resistance go hand in hand, and one of the ways to combat diabetes is to remove the triggering foods.
It’s not a surprise that New Year’s resolutions tend to focus on losing weight, getting healthier, and feeling better. And like most people, you want the weight off yesterday and you want to feel better now! So, even though, deep inside, you know that the smart, sensible way to lose weight and gain more energy is by taking it slow and steady, some of those quick weight-loss plans seem pretty tempting. Maybe what’s caught your attention is a “detox” diet. What can it hurt, you ask?
In type 2 diabetic patient, his pancreas doesn’t produce or use enough insulin, required for a body. This condition is called insulin resistance. Insulin is a hormone, which regulates the movement of glucose in blood and cells, needs to make energy.  For some people, type 2 diabetes may be managed through diet and exercise. Others may also need medication, and sometimes insulin injections, to manage blood sugar.

Deciding to do a longer detox or adopting a prolonged low-sugar or no-sugar diet (after speaking with your healthcare provider first) could help you improve your health beyond simply targeting sugar. You may realize that you finally need to correct other lifestyle choices that cause fatigue, like poor sleep hygiene, or even take a look at your hormone levels in a screening with your doctor.
Dr. Hyman’s research made sense to me, so I thought I’d give his diet a try. With little less than a month until my follow-up doctor’s appointment, I wanted to jumpstart my progress. I read his 10-Day Detox Diet, which cuts out not only the inflammation triggers of gluten, dairy, caffeine, and alcohol, but also all grains, most fruit, legumes, and starchy vegetables, to help maintain balanced blood sugar levels. I welcomed the return of humanely-produced lean protein and an almost laughable amount of healthy fats — nearly 20 g per meal — which was absolutely shocking to someone who grew up in the 1980s and 1990s, when fat was the enemy. Could this really produce results? I was about to find out.
In type 2 diabetic patient, his pancreas doesn’t produce or use enough insulin, required for a body. This condition is called insulin resistance. Insulin is a hormone, which regulates the movement of glucose in blood and cells, needs to make energy.  For some people, type 2 diabetes may be managed through diet and exercise. Others may also need medication, and sometimes insulin injections, to manage blood sugar.
For example, breakfast can include three eggs, any style; lunch can include up to 6 ounces of poultry, fish or tofu and a green salad, and dinner is basically a larger version of lunch, though steamed vegetables such as broccoli, kale and spinach can be eaten in place of salad. Snacks include an ounce of nuts and sliced peppers with hummus. Beverages include water, unsweetened tea and black coffee.
Detoxification, or detox, diets are typically short-term diets that promise to rid the body of environmental toxins. Most detox plans begin with a period of fasting followed by a strict menu of raw vegetables, fruit, juices and/or water. Many plans involve taking specific herbs or other supplements and may require a colon cleanse, otherwise known as an enema.
In this case, “detox” doesn’t mean checking into a rehab facility to wean yourself off alcohol. What “detox” refers to, in the dieting world at least, is a dietary detoxification plan. This is a temporary dieting plan (as are most diets) that involves following a regimen (usually pretty extreme) in order to cleanse your body of “toxic” substances such as pesticides, chemicals, additives, pollutants…or food that just isn’t very good for you. Sometimes people “detox” in order to clear their minds, sharpen their focus, or lose weight quickly.
You may believe that cutting out all sugar entirely from your diet is the best solution. Sassos, however, says this isn't the case for those with years of unhealthy sugar habits under their belt: Simply cutting out sugar or cycling through compensatory behaviors (like "running it off" after eating third helpings of dessert) can lead to even more unhealthy eating patterns down the line. Whether you like to call it a detox or think of it more like a "reset," she argues a long term lifestyle change is the surest way to kick the bad habit.
Disclaimer of Medical Advice: You understand that the blog posts and comments to such blog posts (whether posted by us, our agents or bloggers, or by users) do not constitute medical advice or recommendation of any kind, and you should not rely on any information contained in such posts or comments to replace consultations with your qualified health care professionals to meet your individual needs. The opinions and other information contained in the blog posts and comments do not reflect the opinions or positions of the Site Proprietor.
Tara Bellucci is a lifestyle writer and marketing consultant focused on helping entrepreneurs boost their small businesses. Her work has appeared on Apartment Therapy, The Kitchn, and Boston.com. A co-founder of the Boston Food Swap, she hosts monthly events where people swap homemade and homegrown food. She writes openly about her health journey at MindMouthMantra.com.
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