I’m currently reading the book for the second time. I think that it is outstanding. What you wrote is not taught in medical school, that’s why some physicians may not support it. Don’t worry my friend, the Public will support you, because you have done a superb job of researching, treating yourself and putting it in writing. Let the book speak for itself and you.
Ensure you are eating your micronutrients: Counteract too much sugar by supercharging your next meal for your liver's benefit; namely with dark, leafy green vegetables that are high in a suite of micronutrients. "Try to eat foods to help assist the liver in natural detoxification, which is much healthier than doing something compensatory like sweat out the donuts you just ate… that isn't helpful, and may be harmful, in the long run," Sassos adds.

Diabetes Management has become yet more important in the current situation (read: ongoing Coronavirus pandemic). As per fitness and nutrition expert, Rohit Shelatkar, "the Centre for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has suggested that people with type-2 diabetes are at higher risk of severe troubles from COVID-19 infection." While proper medication is a must to manage diabetes, one must also look into a healthy diet to boost healthy living naturally. "There's a strong link between diabetes, inflammation and immune system. Hence, one must opt for healthy diet options to control blood sugar and strengthen immunity," Shelatkar further stated.


I had also reduced my insulin dosage from 4 shots, 60 units of insulin (Humalog and Lantus) a day down to 1 shot, 10 units (only Lantus). By my next doctor’s appointment, I was down to zero shots and a zero insulin dosage. But, my endocrinologist was not happy and told me to return to my original insulin dosage. He said that since I was going through the “honeymoon period”, my blood sugar would eventually return to the high levels and I would have to go back on insulin.
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